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FAQ


Troubleshooting FAQ’s


Q. The module does not fit into the socket. What’s wrong?
A. Different generations of memory (such as DDR2, DDR3, and DDR4) have their alignment notches in different positions. You may have chosen the wrong memory for your system.

Also, DDR2 ECC Fully-Buffered memory does have its alignment notch in a different position from other forms of DDR2 memory, such as Non-ECC, ECC Unbuffered, and ECC Registered. You may have chosen the wrong DDR2 memory for your system.

Lastly, some smaller desktop computers as well as most “All In One” systems would not use standard desktop memory but would typically use memory similar to what is used in laptops.

Q. The memory fits, but why won’t it work?
A. First of all, be sure that the module is seated correctly. When properly seated, the contacts of the module should be virtually unseen.

Secondly, be sure that you have chosen the right memory for your system. Some systems have limits to the capacity of memory that can be used in each slot, and you may have purchased a capacity size larger than what is supported by your system.

Also, most desktop computers use Non-ECC memory. If your packing slip says “ECC” and not “Non-ECC”, you may have accidentally chosen server memory for your system.

Lastly, there are some systems that can use ECC memory, but require ECC Unbuffered memory as opposed to ECC Registered memory, or vise versa.

If you have bought the wrong memory for your system, please allow us to use our experience to help you. We can pinpoint the right item for your need and figure out how to get you back on track.

If you are certain you bought the right memory for your system, please give us a call. Like any product, it is possible that the manufacturer may have missed something during production or testing, and we do provide a 30-day money-back guarantee if this is the case.

Q. The system boots with the memory installed, but only shows less than 4GB of memory installed. Help!
A. 32-bit versions of Windows cannot access more than 4GB of total system memory, even if the system hardware can be upgraded beyond 4GB. You would need a 64-bit version of Windows to access all of the installed memory.

Helpful hints about installing memory


After you shut down your computer, unplug it. If you are adding the memory to a laptop, remove the battery before beginning.??Be aware that static electricity can harm your memory purchase as well as your computer. For protection, use an anti-static wrist strap according to its instructions. If you do not have an anti-static wrist strap, put the computer on a surface away from fabric, be sure that you are not standing or sitting on carpeting, then touch a metal surface away from the computer and the memory to ground yourself before you start.

If you are installing the memory into a memory socket that has not already been used, you may want to use a can of compressed air to blow out the socket. This will make sure that dust in the socket does not interfere with the operation of the memory.

Installing desktop memory (about 5 1/4” long)
Remove the existing memory (if necessary) by rotating the locking tabs on each side of the module outward. This will pop the old memory out of the socket so you can lift it out of the way.

Make sure that the locking tabs are rotated outward before you attempt to insert the new memory. Align the module above the slot so that the alignment notch in the module matches the alignment pin in the socket. The label on the module does not need to face a certain way. Allow the module to rest on the locking tabs, then press down on the module (one thumb on each side, evenly) until the module makes contact with the socket and the locking tabs rotate themselves back to straight up and down. When installed, you should not be able to see the contacts of the module.

Installing laptop memory (between 2 5/8” and 2 3/4” long)
Remove the existing memory (if necessary) by spreading the locking springs outward. This will pop the old memory to about a 30 degree angle so you can lift it out.

Align the new module in the socket so that the alignment notch in the module matches the alignment pin in the socket. Make contact with the socket at about a 30 degree angle. Rotate the module downward, still in the socket, until the locking springs grab it. When installed, you should only be able to see very little of the contacts of the module if any at all.

Checking to see if the computer recognizes the memory
After installing memory, you should not have to do anything more for the computer to recognize it. Once you plug it back it and turn it back on, the memory should be recognized.

To check to see if the memory is recognized in Windows:
Press and hold the Windows key then tap the Pause/Break key. This opens the System window which will show you the Installed Memory (RAM) which is in the System section of this window.

To check to see if the memory is recognized in Mac OS X:
Click on the Apple, then select About This Mac. This should report the amount of memory installed.